Tummy trouble? How is your gut health?

The health of our gut affects almost every aspect of our mind and body; from our mood and immune system, to digestive health and comfort – so everyone can benefit from eating the right foods to keep it happy.

Gut  Health

 

To help you give your gut the care and attention it deserves, ‘gut guru,’ nutritionist and cook Dr Joan Ransley has selected a range of gut healthy foods for the Love Your Gut campaign.

Dr Joan Ransley’s food picks are full of gut loving fibre and micronutrients and low in components that might upset the gut such as fat and poorly absorbed simple and complex sugars.

Enjoy the foods knowing you are giving your gut the love it deserves!

Fruits

Bananas (not too ripe), blueberries, melon, oranges, pineapples and strawberries are all great gut-friendly options within the fruit category.

 Vegetables

Carrots, broccoli, spinach and kale are amongst the vegetables which provide a great source of dietary fibre, as well as a mix of micronutrients and polyphenols which are good for the bacteria in the gut.

 Herbs and Spices

Gut-friendly spice options include cinnamon, coriander, cumin seeds, ginger and turmeric. Herbs include chives, parsley, fresh coriander, tarragon and dill.

Oily Fish for gut health

Oily fish such as salmon is a great option for the gut as they contain omega-3s which can help to combat gut inflammation.

Oats

The outer layer of the oat kernel is high in a soluble fibre called beta-glucan which retains fluid and gently stimulates a stubborn bowel.

 

So how is your gut health and are you committed to trying some of the kitchen must haves that improve tummy health?

Gut Health  And How To Improve It

Getting over post-natal depression is possible and I really want women to know that as I know how truly awful the condition can be. I am writing this post to talk about some of the signs of post-natal depression that families, friends and colleagues can look for, I will also highlight some of the tools that can help a mum going through post-natal depression. I am hoping that mums who are starting to recover but might not feel that will be given hope by this post as highlight some of the signs mums are on the mend.

Getting Over Post-Natal Depression

Signs of post-natal depression

Poor personal hygience
Finding it hard to throw the duvet back in the morning
Never getting thrilled about anything
Seeking out darkness
Being scared of other people

Things that help women in getting over post-natal depression

Online support via social networks and mum groups like Net Mums and Mumsnet
Baby steps and not expecting too much of yourself
Writing or blogging it out can be helpful

Talking therapies

Getting Over Post-Natal Depression

Medication

What happens when you start to recover from post-natal depression?

Even in tiny ways you will start to feel like a somebody rather than a nobody. It is so easy to lose sight of yourself as a mum.
Tackling health issues such as needing to lose weight or gain weight
Investing in treats for yourself
Looking after yourself
Not accepting everything people dump on you
Noticing light and that there really is one at the end of the tunnel
You realize your story can help others
You stop always putting other people first
You start to say yes to positive experiences rather than hiding from them
You know you can make a fresh start
Expressing your thoughts and feelings and saying what you need
Recognizing your own talents, skills qualities and achievements
You realize you are not alone
You stop self-medicating with booze or other negative influences

Is it worth seeking help for post-natal depression?

There is lots of help out there both medication and talking therapies – neither define you as bad or mad although your poor friend depression might try to convince you of that until you get better
You will enjoy parenting in a much fuller way when you start to recover.
You will also be a better parent to your children although you are a good enough mum right now
You can make up for the dark days by making new and positive memories for you and yours

What needs to change?

Better recognition of the signs of post-natal depression
More resources for mental health services
More recognition and support for mums in the workplace

I know about getting over post-natal depression because I have done it but it was a long battle and I want to speed the recovery period up for other mums if I am able to do so.

 

 



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Post Comment Love
Twin Mummy and Daddy

Lucy At Home

Wendy’s son has Down Syndrome and she kindly agreed to share her celebration of her life with him.

What is a human being?

NOUN

· A man, woman, or child of the species “Homo sapiens” , distinguished from other animals by superior mental development, power of articulate speech, and upright stance.

Son Has Down Syndrome

Personally, I believe there are many more qualities than this that make up the complex definition of a human being. Empathy, emotion, self-awareness to name but a few. What the above definition does not explain is exactly what is superior mental development? What is articulate speech? If you cannot stand upright are you less than human? Who, or what are we comparing ourselves to and who decides what makes us superior?

So many questions, and why do I ask?

My son has Down Syndrome

My son is three years old, comparative to his peers, he does not have superior mental development or articulate speech, but he is human and he has Down Syndrome. So is he less worthy of life? Current UK law classifies Down Syndrome as a severe disability and therefore allows termination up to 40 weeks. The termination rate following a positive diagnosis of Down syndrome is around 92%, in some countries it is 100%.

Hundreds of thousands of pounds of NHS money is spent improving prenatal testing in order to detect genetic ‘abnormalities’. I understand that they can also detect other syndromes such as Edward’s and Patua Syndrome, which are life limiting conditions and to know of any pre-existing condition can be the difference between life and death.

The problem I have is when archaic information is given at the time of diagnosis from medical professionals and the media generally have a negative view on Down Syndrome. If you are given nothing but a gloomy account of what a child with DS will bring you, how can you make an informed choice?

You may think that I exaggerate but some midwives are actually taught to tell parents ‘it’s bad news’. Some women have been booked in for terminations despite stating categorically that their baby is very much wanted.

So let me tell you a little bit about my son, and then you can decide if he is less worthy of life, and a burden on society who brings me nothing but hardship and misery.

Celebrating a little boy’s life

I’m usually woken at around 6 am with some chirruping sounds coming through the monitor, as I slowly awaken this turns to happy chatter (he’s a mini Alan Carr), and he happily plays in his room until I’m finished showering and dressing at around 7 am. When I go through, he has pulled all his cuddly toys and some books into his bed and he is enthusiastically hugging them and pretending to read to them. I am greeted by an indescribable smile of pure joy, I undo his sleeping bag and hold my arms out. He toddles over to me and flings his tiny arms around my neck, holding on for twenty, maybe thirty seconds of bliss. He hands me a book and we sit on the floor while I read (and sign) the story.

We have breakfast, he scoops yoghurt into his mouth (and everywhere else) while he watches Peppa Pig. Squealing in delight and running around the room when the excitement gets too much. He signals to me that he wants the milk from my cereal, it’s teamwork, he finishes what I would normally waste. At some point whilst I’m getting ready he will jump on my knee, covering me in yoghurt, stroking my hair and bouncing up and down.

My Son  Has Downs Syndrome

When we go out we go swimming, horse riding or perhaps to a wildlife sanctuary where he can interact with the animals. He wants to hug everything, from ducks to donkeys to bunnies to birds of prey. As you can imagine some creatures are not so taken with the cuddles, some relinquish willingly.

My son is amazing, he has a zest for life that I have never seen in any other human, he has a determination that I could only dream of, he is happy, he is healthy and he is loved beyond words. These are the bits that the medical world don’t see, that the media don’t want to see.

Yes, he can be a pain in the bum and sometimes a total nightmare, can’t any child? We have our challenges, I’m a single parent so that is to be expected. But the joy that this tiny person brings to my life, and all those around him, surpasses any negatives or challenges that we may encounter. He is my teacher, my inspiration and my guiding star. He is a human being.

He is more worthy of life than so many, but there is no prenatal test to detect who will be a murderer or paedophile, but sadly there is a prenatal test for an extra chromosome.

So please, don’t feel sorry for me or give me pity, Be jealous, because I get to see life through the eyes of a child with Down Syndrome, I get to see life through the eyes of Elijah with wondrous excitement and awe.

Elijah, you are my world, and without you in it, I would cease to exist.

https://www.facebook.com/thisiselijahUK/

https://twitter.com/ThisisElijahUK

https://thisiselijah.com/

Thanks so much Wendy for sharing your story with  us and for showing that yes your son has Down Syndrome but is very much an individual in his own right.

 

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