The best flooring for your conservatory

The conservatory (which a lot of people would call a porch, even though they’re technically difference things) is one of the most heat-sensitive rooms in any house, mostly thanks to the flooring material it uses. What does flooring have to do with it? Well, with some help from Amtico, we’ve created this list of the best flooring for your conservatory that should hopefully explain things:

Engineered wood – not natural, but better

There’s nothing quite like wood, and a lot of homeowners would love to use natural materials as their flooring. Unfortunately, it’s really hard to keep it from breaking or warping. Engineered wood is basically the same thing with some artificial touch-ups: it’s replaced natural wood in so many ways that most people don’t realize there’s two different types at all!

This kind of wood can let you keep a natural element to your flooring without needing to suffer the pain of fixing it every few years. Water and mud damage can still be a problem, but a rug doormat can keep areas near doors dry if you put it in the right place.

Vinyl tiles

Since its technically another layer of flooring, rather than a completely new project, tiled vinyl flooring can be a great choice for homeowners who want new flooring without the hassle of tearing up the old one. It’s easy to clean, easy to remove and surprisingly good at regulating your conservatory’s heat: the tiles will be warmer than marble tiles in winter, but cooler than exposed wood in summer.

Most types of vinyl are scratch and stain resistant, but sunlight might make the colours fade slightly: if you chose them for their aesthetic looks, be sure to use blinds or curtains whenever you can, or you’ll end up with a weirdly-discoloured floor that can look really messy.

Carpet

Carpet can be a fiddly type of flooring. If your family isn’t good at keeping dirt out of the house, then it’s probably a bad idea to put a nice cream carpet so close to an exterior door in summer: that being said, if you’re dirt-savvy and know how to properly clean your shoes, it can be a great way to add some extra comfort to a room.

In winter, it’ll definitely keep your feet warm, but be careful during summer – aside from getting discoloured in bright light, it might also heat up the conservatory in bright light, which can turn it from “warm” to “unpleasantly hot” in only a few minutes of sunlight.

Stone and marble tiles

You don’t see these often, but stone is well-known for making very smooth flooring. Unfortunately, it’s also easily warmed up and cooled by the weather, which can make it a huge problem in the middle of summer and winter.

That’s not to say it doesn’t have its place: a stone or marble floor is extremely scratch resistant and can be covered with thick rugs to keep it nice and warm underfoot. If you really wanted to stretch your conservatory to it’s absolute limits, you could even install a little indoor fireplace or litter candles around the room for the winter – even if they’re knocked onto the floor, the fire has nothing to burn.

The Best Flooring For Your Conservatory

 

 

ethannevelyn.com

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2 Comments

  1. Sarah Stockley (@kipperscurtains) August 11, 2018 / 10:03 am

    We have literally just replaced our old flooring with a pale grey, wood effect laminate, t has made such a huge difference. #FabFridayPost

  2. ethannevelyn.com August 13, 2018 / 8:51 am

    How interesting! I did not know about this before. When I do have a house of my own I will remember these points above.

    Thank you very much for linking up with us on #FabFridayPost

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